A Theory Of Group Development Bennis And Shepard Pdf

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a theory of group development bennis & sheppard

This study of the complete life-spans of eight naturally-ocurring teams began with the unexpected finding that several project groups, studied for another purpose, did not accomplish their work by progressing gradually through a universal series of stages, as traditional group development models would predict. The findings also suggested that groups' progress was triggered more by members' awareness of time and deadlines than by completion of an absolute amount of work in a specific developmental stage.

The paper proposes a new model of group development that encompasses the timing and mechanisms of change as well as groups' dynamic relations with their contexts. Implications for theory, research, and practice are drawn. Learn About the New eReader. Downloaded 64 times in the past 12 months. Published online 30 November Published in print 1 March Connie J. Download Citations Add to favorites Track Citations. View article. Script processing in attitude formation and decision making.

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Group development (I): A review and synthesis of development models

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Article Information, PDF download for A Theory of Group Development, Open SHEPARD, H. A., and BENNIS, W. G. "A Theory of Training by Group Methods.


Theories of Team Development

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Group Development (I): A Review and Synthesis of Development Models

Theoretical history of group development in its application to psychotherapy groups.

This is the first of two parts that examine the issue of group development and its impact on the study design of group support systems GSS. We review the various models of group development, analyze the sources of differences among these models, and synthesize common themes across various models. The paper concludes with a meta-framework for understanding group development; this framework highlights the two areas of focus that have dominated group development research in the past: group processes and outcomes. The second paper will build on the ideas developed here and discuss the implications of group development for GSS research. Previous research on group behavior suggests that groups change over time; patterns of change, referred to as group development models, have been an important area of study for the past four decades. For the first three of these decades, unitary models of group development were very popular; that is, the notion that all groups go through a certain series of predefined stages. In the last decade, however, researchers have cast doubt on such unitary models of group development.

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This is the first of two parts that examine the issue of group development and its impact on the study design of group support systems GSS. We review the various models of group development, analyze the sources of differences among these models, and synthesize common themes across various models. The paper concludes with a meta-framework for understanding group development; this framework highlights the two areas of focus that have dominated group development research in the past: group processes and outcomes. The second paper will build on the ideas developed here and discuss the implications of group development for GSS research. Previous research on group behavior suggests that groups change over time; patterns of change, referred to as group development models, have been an important area of study for the past four decades. For the first three of these decades, unitary models of group development were very popular; that is, the notion that all groups go through a certain series of predefined stages. In the last decade, however, researchers have cast doubt on such unitary models of group development.

This study of the complete life-spans of eight naturally-ocurring teams began with the unexpected finding that several project groups, studied for another purpose, did not accomplish their work by progressing gradually through a universal series of stages, as traditional group development models would predict. The findings also suggested that groups' progress was triggered more by members' awareness of time and deadlines than by completion of an absolute amount of work in a specific developmental stage. The paper proposes a new model of group development that encompasses the timing and mechanisms of change as well as groups' dynamic relations with their contexts. Implications for theory, research, and practice are drawn. Learn About the New eReader. Downloaded 64 times in the past 12 months. Published online 30 November Published in print 1 March

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